Course Descriptions & Syllabi

Course Descriptions & Syllabi

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Note: some or all of the courses in the subjects marked as "Transfer" can be used towards a transfer degree: Associate of Science and Arts or Associate of Engineering Science at DACC. Transferability for specific institutions and majors varies. Consult a counselor for this information.

Areas of Study | | PHYS142 syllabus




COURSE NUMBER: PHYS142
COURSE TITLE:Physical Science II
DIVISION:Sciences
IAI CODE(S): P9 900L
SEMESTER CREDIT HOURS:4
CONTACT HOURS:75
STUDENT ENGAGEMENT HOURS:180
DELIVERY MODE:In-Person

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHYS 142 is an introductory course in geology, meteorology and astronomy. Emphasis is placed on the basic concepts of these sciences for a better understanding of the earth, atmosphere, and the universe. The course is taught using active and cooperative learning techniques. Students will be expected to work in teams to produce several projects. For non-science majors. Class meets for 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week.

PREREQUISITES:
Place into ENGL101 and MATH108.

NOTES: A lab is required for this course. Some sections will require a separate lab, while other sections will include the lab. It is helpful if students have some experience with Microsoft Word, PowerPoint and Excel.


STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
  • Use multiple linked topics to understand complicated astronomical, meteorological, and geological phenomena.
  • Work in group laboratory projects, determining roles and duties as members of the group, and collecting, analyzing, and presenting data and conclusions.
  • Work in group laboratory projects, determining roles and duties as members of the group, and collecting, analyzing, and presenting data and conclusions.
  • Use the internet to research various topics, and will present their research project using Powerpoint or other presentation software.
  • Gain experience in working with a group as they create several different team projects throughout the semester.
  • Brainstorming to create the project, problem solving, and presentation technique are important aspects of team work.
  • Topic Specific Outcomes
    • The emphasis of this course is to gain a basic knowledge of geology, meteorology, and astronomy.
    • This is done through
      • student created study guides
      • student created creative projects
      • student created review games
    • Demonstrate mastery of the geology, meteorology, and astronomy outcomes below.
    • Students will illustrate understanding of concepts through project presentations and examinations using appropriate terminology and proper laboratory and communication skills.
  • Geology Section
    • Crystal structure of minerals
      • identification of selected minerals
      • the rock cycle
      • major rock types
      • origin of rocks in the crust
    • Internal structure of the Earth
      • seismic waves and the S-wave shadow zone
      • plate tectonics
      • type of plate boundaries
      • formation of mountains
      • types
      • relate to plate tectonics
      • terranes
      • identify rocks and minerals
    • Earthquakes
      • Richter scale
      • famous earthquakes
      • the San Andreas and New Madrid fault systems
      • normal and reverse faults
      • anticlines
      • synclines
      • types of volcanoes
      • cause
      • some famous eruptions
    • Rivers, streams and glaciers
      • Pleistocene glaciation
      • local features such as moraines and erratics caused by glaciation
      • cause of the ice ages
    • Ground water
      • aquifers
      • local geology
      • coal mines
      • salt wells
      • water supplies
      • oil deposits of southern Illinois. (optional)
  • Astronomy Section
    • Planets of the solar system
      • salient features of some planets
      • origin of the solar system
      • comets
      • meteorites and the asteroid belt
      • Bodes Law
    • History of astronomy
      • geocentric and heliocentric theories
      • development of the calendar
      • time and date around the Earth
      • latitude and longitude of the Earth
    • The sun
      • features and fusion reactions
      • types of stars
      • evolution
      • the H-R diagram
      • White dwarf and neutron stars
    • The universe of galaxies
      • the red shift and expansion of the universe
      • the "big bang" theory
      • Star positions by right ascension and declination
      • star maps
      • identify major constellations
      • seasonal and circumpolar constellations
  • Meteorology
    • Composition of the atmosphere
      • the barometer
      • hydrometer
      • Structure of the upper atmosphere
      • importance of the ionosphere and ozone layer
      • cause of the aurora
    • General circulation of the atmosphere
      • desert belts; effect on local weather
      • effect on local weather
      • Cold and warm fronts
      • cloud types
      • Storms
      • hurricanes
      • tornadoes
    • Weather maps
      • low and high pressure systems
      • the jet stream

TOPICAL OUTLINE:

This section contains an outline of the major topics covered in the course.

  • Geology 4-5 weeks
    • Minerals and their uses
      • identification of selected minerals
      • Moh's scale
      • streak test
      • physical properties of minerals
    • Crystal structure of selected minerals
      • formation of diamond and graphite
      • silicate and non-silicate minerals
      • common elements in the earth's crust
      • ores
    • Rock types
      • the rock cycle
      • rock identification in the laboratory
    • Formation of the earth and the earth's interior
      • layers and seismic waves
      • crust
      • mantle and core
      • isostasy and mountains
      • magnetic field
      • cause
      • plate tectonics
      • evidence
      • sea floor spreading
      • Wegner-Pangaea
      • hot spots and the Hawaiian chain of volcanoes
      • types of plate boundaries
      • terranes and California
      • continental drift and ancient climates
      • cyclothems and coal beds
      • glaciers in Africa
    • Diastrophism, orogenies and mountain building
      • stress and strain
      • synclines and anticlines
      • faults
      • types
      • earthquakes
      • the Richter scale
      • some major quakes
      • local fault zones and quakes
      • epicenter
      • the 3-circle method of locating quakes
      • seismographs
      • volcanoes, 3 major types
      • subducting plates and volcanoes
      • hot spots
      • calderas
      • Yellowstone National Park
      • some major eruptions
    • Weathering and erosion
      • steams and rivers-local rivers and types
      • ground water
      • wells
      • aquifers
      • glaciers
      • pleistocene glaciation locally - features such as moraines and erratics
      • theories on the cause of the ice ages
      • the Teays buried river system as a source of water for this area
      • study of topographic maps
  • Astronomy 4-5 weeks
    • Ancient ideas
      • Stonehenge
      • the Zodiac
      • Celestial locations - zenith, meridian, altitude; parallax, the parsec
      • star magnitude and temperature
    • Spectral types of stars
      • the H-R diagram
      • evolution of stars
      • Red Giants and White Dwarfs
      • neutron stars
      • galaxies
      • the red shift and expansion of the universe
      • the Big-Bang theory
    • The Solar System
      • geocentric and heliocentric models
      • movement
      • retrograde movement of Mars
      • relative size of the planets
      • some remarkable features of some planets
      • Kepler's Laws
      • Bode's Law
      • origin of the Solar system
      • Surface features of Mars and Venus
      • the Galilean Moons
      • comets
      • meteorites and the asteroid belt
      • space probes and new views of Jupiter and Saturn
    • Size and shape of the Earth
      • Eratosthenes the seasons
      • cause
      • movements of the Sun
      • Foucault Pendulum
      • precession and the Zodiac
      • latitude and longitude
      • time and date around the Earth
      • sundials
      • time zones
      • lunar phases and features
  • Meteorology 4-5 weeks
    • The atmosphere, composition, pressure; the barometer
      • layers
      • the stratosphere
      • wind
      • global circulation-desert zones
      • doldrums
      • Bermuda high
      • relative humidity
      • dew point
      • cloud formation
      • types of clouds-stratus
      • cumulus
      • fog
      • rainbows
    • Air Masses
      • weather fronts
      • storms
      • tornadoes
      • hurricanes
      • cumulonimbus clouds
      • hail
      • lightning
      • weather maps and forecasting
      • Cloud formation and type
LABS:
  • Lab 1 - Safety & Procedures
    • Students will review safety information, as well as laboratory policies and procedures.
  • Lab 2 – Astronomy Lab 1
    • Stellar Evolution and Populations
      • This lab allows students to investigate the different classes of stars, as well as understand and visualize the enormous number of stars in the galaxy and universe.
  • Lab 3 – Astronomy Lab 2
    • Solar System Model
      • This lab has students determine measurements for a scale model of the solar system, improving their organization, research, and Excel skills.
  • Lab 4 – Astronomy Lab 3
    • The Four Seasons
      • This exercise will help the student understand why there are four different seasons, latitude and longitude will also be studied
    • Moon Phases and Visible Features on the Moon
      • This lab will study the phases of the moon and the cause for the phase. Features of the moon, lunar gravity, and tides are also discussed
  • Lab 5 – Introduction to Research Projects, and Research for Astronomy Presentations
    • Students are required to complete a group research project for each of the three course units.
    • Students have substantial freedom in picking a topic of interest related to the course unit.
    • Astronomy topics have included various planets in the solar system, black holes, constellations, various space missions, and many other topics
  • Lab 6 – Astronomy Research Presentations
    • Students present their research projects to the class, allowing their classmates to learn about a diversity of topics and allowing students to learn valuable skills related to the presentation of material.
  • Lab 7 – Meteorology Lab 1
    • Weather Forecasting Tools and Instruments
      • This exercise allows students to learn how to use modern weather forecasting sites over the Internet, understand various data collected by weather stations, and practice course material related to lapse rate, temperature conversions, and other meteorological data.
      • Students also learn about the physical instruments (present and historical) used to collect weather-related data.
  • Lab 8 – Meteorology Lab 2
    • Climate
      • This lab introduces students to the basics of different climate zones and types, as well as allowing some understanding of how large and small scale features affect climate of global and local scopes.
  • Lab 9 – Research for Meteorology Presentations
    • Students are required to complete a group research project for each of the three course units.
    • Students have substantial freedom in picking a topic of interest related to the course unit.
    • Meteorology topics have included various forms of extreme weather, climate events in history, climate zones, and many other topics
  • Lab 10 – Meteorology Research Presentations
    • Students present their research projects to the class, allowing their classmates to learn about a diversity of topics and allowing students to learn valuable skills related to the presentation of material.
  • Lab 11 – Geology Lab 1
    • Minerals and Rocks
      • This exercise is primarily concerned with identifying minerals.
      • Six characteristics are obtained for each mineral (streak color, hardness, color and features, luster, cleavage/fracture, and density).
  • Lab 12 – Geology Lab 2
    • Faults and Earthquakes
      • This lab is used to learn more about faults and earthquakes.
      • Sample data is given for students to locate the epicenter of an earthquake.
  • Lab 13 – Geology Lab 3
    • Geologic Time
      • Students learn the basics of geologic time, including the different divisions (eon through epoch), and some information about the Earth in those different historic times.
  • Lab 14 – Research for Geology Presentations
    • Students are required to complete a group research project for each of the three course units.
    • Students have substantial freedom in picking a topic of interest related to the course unit.
    • Geology topics have included the Grand Canyon, Plate Tectonics, Volcanoes, Earthquakes, and many other topics.
  • Lab 15 – Geology Research Presentations
    • Students present their research projects to the class, allowing their classmates to learn about a diversity of topics and allowing students to learn valuable skills related to the presentation of material.

TEXTBOOK / SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Physical Science, 9th Edition. Bill W. Tillery. McGraw-Hill Publishers.

Web access required.

See bookstore website for current book(s) at https://www.dacc.edu/bookstore

EVALUATION:

The evaluation of a student's progress in attaining course objectives is measured by 3 major exams in the lecture and periodic testing in lab.

The evaluation of a student's progress in attaining course objectives is measured by the following tasks and their weightings:
Quizzes
Three exams
Laboratory assignments
Three group research projects
Comprehensive Final Exam
9%
10%
18%
18%
25%

Grading Scale:
A- 90-100%
B- 80-89%
C- 70-79%
D- 60-69%
F- Below 60%


BIBLIOGRAPHY:

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE:
Membership in the DACC community brings both rights and responsibility. As a student at DACC, you are expected to exhibit conduct compatible with the educational mission of the College. Academic dishonesty, including but not limited to, cheating and plagiarism, is not tolerated. A DACC student is also required to abide by the acceptable use policies of copyright and peer-to-peer file sharing. It is the student’s responsibility to become familiar with and adhere to the Student Code of Conduct as contained in the DACC Student Handbook. The Student Handbook is available in the Information Office in Vermilion Hall and online at: https://www.dacc.edu/student-handbook

DISABILITY SERVICES:
Any student who feels s/he may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the Testing & Academic Services Center at 217-443-8708 (TTY 217-443-8701) or stop by Cannon Hall Room 103. Please speak with your instructor privately to discuss your specific accommodation needs in this course.

REVISION:
Spring 2019

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