Course Descriptions & Syllabi

Course Descriptions & Syllabi

Search Course IDs and descriptions for:

Find complete words only

Note: some or all of the courses in the subjects marked as "Transfer" can be used towards a transfer degree: Associate of Science and Arts or Associate of Engineering Science at DACC. Transferability for specific institutions and majors varies. Consult a counselor for this information.

Areas of Study | | PHYS101 syllabus




COURSE NUMBER: PHYS101
COURSE TITLE:Physics-Mechanics/Heat
DIVISION:Sciences
IAI CODE(S): P1 900L
SEMESTER CREDIT HOURS:5
CONTACT HOURS:90
STUDENT ENGAGEMENT HOURS:225
DELIVERY MODE:In-Person

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
PHYS 101 is the first semester of a two-semester course in introductory physics for science majors/health career students which discusses kinematics, forces, energy and heat. The class meets for four one-hour lecture periods and one two-hour lab each week.

PREREQUISITES:
Placement into MATH120 (Calculus & Analytic Geometry I M1 900 EGR 901 MTH 901) with approved and documented math placement test scores or by completing MATH111 (College Algebra) and MATH114 (Trigonometry MTM 901) with a grade of C or better.

NOTES: Labs are required for this course. Each week, students are required to do a lab. All the labs are set by the instructor before the class. Each lab is composed by four different part, pre-lab questions, data taking, calculations, conclusion drawing. Each part uses about 30 minutes, and the total lab time is two hours per week. All the labs are traditional hands-on bench labs. In the laboratory experience, students are expected to use scientific methodology to formulate or evaluate questions, to make systematic observations and measurements, to interpret and analyze data, to draw conclusions, to test the given hypotheses, and to communicate the results orally or in writing. Data interpretation and error analysis uses linear least square fits to get the best results. Critical thinking, technology skills, problem solving skills, communication skills and cultural awareness are embedded in course work. Critical thinking skills are measured by rigorous homework problems including defining the problem, constructing a method for solving, and evaluating the result. Technology skills are embedded in the course, such as using computers with current software, and the tools used in making measurements, such as computer controlled photogate to measure the time interval. Technology skills are assessed by evaluate the accuracy the lab results. Social skills are embedded in the course, such as working in team, defining roles, planning projects, developing oral or written lab reports. Students are expected to assess and to evaluate the effectiveness of teamwork by using a rubric. The class web page is updated every week, which provides supplemental information such as announcements, lecture notes, homework assignment, and students' grades. Pre-lab questions, data taking, data analyzing, calculations, conclusion drawing are embedded in the face-to-face lab periods.


STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
  • Clearly show work or provide clear explanation as how to setup and generate a solution for application problems
  • Use, understand and write all required physics symbols and abbreviations
  • Clearly relate interpretation of solutions to standard real world physics application problems
  • Achieve strong critical thinking skills in terms of problem solving
  • Determine from any initial question of any of the following that apply: correctly make use of online supplemental tools to judge the reasonableness of a solution or answer and justify all processes used.
  • PHYS 101 encourages development of observation, classification, analysis, and deduction skills
  • understand the collection of data, how to formulate general laws from the data, and how to transfer a general law to a specific situation. In addition to understanding of the scientific method, the student is to understand the philosophy and logic of scientific thought by being able to work problems
  • gain competence in reading and understanding scientific material, as well

TOPICAL OUTLINE:

PHYS 101 is a 16-week course. The following list is the time spent on each topic. Students who successfully complete the course will demonstrate the following outcomes by properly finishing their regular homework, presentations, quizzes, tests and a final exam. Students will construct graphs, charts, free body diagrams, interpret them, and draw appropriate conclusions. Students will communicate meaningfully in writing while presenting information and provide solutions with the procedure, results, organization, diagrams and other details necessary for another person to review. At the end of the course, students will be able to solve problem regarding to design and safety. Every week, students will actually do a group bench lab, which is composed of four parts: pre-lab questions, data taking, calculations, and conclusion drawing. For each lab, students are expected to use scientific methodology to evaluate questions, to make systematic observations and measurements, to interpret and analyze data, to draw conclusions uses linear-least square-fits to get the best results, to test the given hypotheses, to calculate the percent errors, and to communicate the results orally or in writing. The student should be able to understand and apply the following:

  1. Week 1: INTRODUCTION
    • Discussing models, theories, laws, measurement and uncertainty
    • Understanding SI system and converting units
    • Lab
      • Measurement of Length
      • Repeated measurements of the dimensions is used to learn the statistical concepts of experimental uncertainty, mean, standard deviation and standard error
  2. Week 2: KINEMATICS IN ONE DIMENSION
    • Discussing reference frames, displacement, average and instantaneous velocity, acceleration
    • Solving problems in motion at constant acceleration such as free falling objects
    • Lab
      • Measurement of Density
      • To calculate the density of cylinders by measuring their mass, diameter and length
      • The propagation of errors is determined
  3. Week 3: KINEMATICS IN TWO DIMENSIONS; VECTORS
    • Discussing Vector addition and subtraction by graphical and by components
    • Performing multiplication of a vector by a scalar
    • Solving problems involving projectile motion
    • Lab
      • Force Table and Vector Addition of Forces
      • To demonstration of the processes of vector addition and subtraction using both graph method and analytical method
  4. Week 4: MOTION AND FORCE: DYNAMICS
    • Solving problems with Newton’s first, second, and third law of motion
    • Discussing force, mass, and free-body diagrams; Solving problems involving weight, normal force, friction forces on inclines
    • Lab
      • Uniformly Accelerated Motion on the Air Track
      • Use a linear air track to measure the acceleration of a track, and then calculate the gravitational acceleration
  5. Week 5: CIRCULAR MOTION; GRAVITATION
    • Discussing kinematics and dynamics of uniform circular motion
    • Understanding Newton’s universal gravitation law
    • Solving problems of a car rounding a curve and a satellites rounding the Earth
    • Lab
      • Coefficient of Friction
      • To determine the static and kinetic coefficients of friction, and to verify that the coefficients are independent to the normal force and the contracting area
  6. Week 6: REVIEW AND HOURLY EXAM
    • Lab
      • Newton’s Second Law on the Atwood Machine
      • Demonstration of that acceleration is proportional to the applied force and inversely proportional to the mass of the object
  7. Week 7: WORK AND ENERGY
    • Discussing work done by a constant force
    • Understanding kinetic, potential and other forms of energy
    • Solving problems using conservation of energy and work-energy principle
    • Lab
      • Torques and Rotational Equilibrium of a Rigid Body
      • Measurement of the magnitude and position of forces on the meter stick to verify the conditions for equilibrium of a rigid body
  8. Week 8: LINEAR MOMENTUM
    • Discussing momentum, impulse and center of mass
    • Understanding elastic and inelastic collisions
    • Solving problems using energy and momentum conservation in collisions
    • Lab
      • Conservation of Spring and Gravitational Potential Energy
      • To determine the spring constant of a spring, and to measure the potential energy and kinetic energy of a puck
  9. Week 9: ROTATIONAL MOTION
    • Discussing torque, rotational inertia, rotational kinetic energy and other angular quantities
    • Understanding angular momentum and its conservation
    • Solving problems in rotational motion by using kinematics equations for objects with uniform angular acceleration
    • Lab
      • The Ballistic Pendulum and Projectile Motion
      • To determine the initial velocity of a ball, and to determine the kinetic energy loss in the collision of the ball with the pendulum
  10. Week 10: BODIES IN EQUILIBRIUM; ELASTICITY AND FRACTURE
    • Discussing statics and the conditions for equilibrium
    • Understanding elasticity, stress, strain and fracture
    • Lab
      • Conservation of Momentum on the Air Track
      • To determine the velocity of each glider before and after the collision, and to verify the conservation of total momentum
  11. Week 11: REVIEW AND HOURLY EXAM
    • Lab
      • Centripetal Acceleration of an Object in Circular Motion
      • To measure the period, speed and the centripetal force of an object in constant speed circular motion
  12. Week 12: FLUIDS
    • Discussing density, specific gravity, pressure in fluids and atmospheric, Pascal’s principle, flow rate and buoyancy
    • Understanding Archimedes’ principle
    • Solving problems using the equation of continuity and Bernoulli’s equation
    • Lab
      • Moment of Inertia and Rotational Motion
      • To measure the time and the falling distance of a weight as it causes a cylinder to rotate, and to determine the moment of inertia of the cylinder
  13. Week 13: TEMPERATURE AND KINETIC THEORY
    • Discussing atomic theory, kinetic theory and the molecular interpretation of temperature
    • Understanding thermal expansion, thermal stress, and thermometers
    • Solving problem with the ideal gas law
    • Lab
      • Archimedes’ Principle
      • To verify the Archimedes’ Principle, and to determine the specific gravity of several solid objects and liquids
  14. Week 14: HEAT
    • Discussing distinction between temperature, heat, and internal energy, and specific heat
    • Understanding calorimetry, latent heat, heat transfer in conduction, convection and radiation
    • Lab
      • Specific Heat of Metals
      • To determine the specific heat of samples made from different metals by using Calorimeter and stirrer
  15. Week 15: THE LAWS OF THERMODYNAMICS
    • Discussing the zeroth, the first, the second, and the third law of thermodynamics applied to simple systems
    • Solving problems of heat engines and entropy
    • Lab
      • Linear Thermal Expansion
      • To determine the value of the linear coefficient of thermal expansion of several meters
  16. Week 16: REVIEW AND FINAL EXAM
    • Lab
      • The Ideal Gas Law
      • To verify the Ideal Gas Law by measuring the pressure, temperature and the volume of a sample of air in a large plastic syringe

TEXTBOOK / SPECIAL MATERIALS:

Physics, 5th Edition, Giancoli. Prentice Hall Publishers, 1998.
Physics Laboratory Manual, 2nd Edition, David H. Loyd, Harcourt College Publishers, 1997.
A TI-83 or better calculator is recommended.

See bookstore website for current book(s) at https://www.dacc.edu/bookstore

EVALUATION:

The classroom activity is a lecture-demonstration-discussion situation with an attempt to involve the student directly with the material being presented. Homework is either collected or discussed in class. Homework exercises are about 75% numerical and 25% explanation-discussion. All the homework questions are selected from the textbook. The difficult level of the homework questions are similar to the examples discussed during the lecture period. 5-minute-long quizzes are given over each chapter or main topic. There are three major hourly exams. All the quiz/exam questions are selected from the Test Bank which comes from the textbook publisher. Half of the questions are in multiple choice format, while the others are in regular format. A 5-inch formula card and calculators are allowed during the quizzes/exams. Students are expected to spend about additional 5 hours outside the class to complete the homework assignment, to finalize their weekly lab reports and to prepare their quizzes/exams.

The final grade is determined by:

Final exam
major exams
laboratory
homework, quizzes, and presentations
25%
45%
15%
15%
The grading scale is:
A= 90-100
B= 80 - 89.9
C= 70 - 79.9
D= 60 - 69.9
F= 0-59.9

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
  • Contemporary College Physics, by Edwin R. Jones and Richard L. Childers, 3rd Edition, Addison Wesley, 2001.
  • Conceptual Physics Package Edition by Paul A. Hewitt, 2005.
STUDENT CONDUCT CODE:
Membership in the DACC community brings both rights and responsibility. As a student at DACC, you are expected to exhibit conduct compatible with the educational mission of the College. Academic dishonesty, including but not limited to, cheating and plagiarism, is not tolerated. A DACC student is also required to abide by the acceptable use policies of copyright and peer-to-peer file sharing. It is the student’s responsibility to become familiar with and adhere to the Student Code of Conduct as contained in the DACC Student Handbook. The Student Handbook is available in the Information Office in Vermilion Hall and online at: https://www.dacc.edu/student-handbook

DISABILITY SERVICES:
Any student who feels s/he may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the Testing & Academic Services Center at 217-443-8708 (TTY 217-443-8701) or stop by Cannon Hall Room 103. Please speak with your instructor privately to discuss your specific accommodation needs in this course.

REVISION:
Spring 2019

Upcoming Events