Course Descriptions & Syllabi

Course Descriptions & Syllabi

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Note: some or all of the courses in the subjects marked as "Transfer" can be used towards a transfer degree: Associate of Science and Arts or Associate of Engineering Science at DACC. Transferability for specific institutions and majors varies. Consult a counselor for this information.

Areas of Study | | LITR104 syllabus




COURSE NUMBER: LITR104
COURSE TITLE:Afro-American Literature
DIVISION:Liberal Arts
IAI CODE(S): H3 910D
SEMESTER CREDIT HOURS:3
CONTACT HOURS:135
STUDENT ENGAGEMENT HOURS:
DELIVERY MODE:In-Person, Online

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is a survey of texts by prominent African American writers and speakers from the 18th, 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries and includes an introduction to fiction, poetry, nonfiction and drama, along with examples of political and public discourse. Students will analyze how authors employ different techniques in a number of genres and will explore prominent themes within this particular literary tradition, including (but not limited to) identity, belonging, freedom, and security. Students will establish connections between historical events, such as reconstruction and the development of Jim Crow laws, and the development of the African American literary tradition. Interconnections between the African American literary tradition and African American folklore and music will also be established. Students will critically read in order to craft written arguments and informative presentations and to contribute to critical, academic in-class discussions.

PREREQUISITES:
Place into ENGL101.

NOTES:

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
  • define key concepts, such as race and racism, on written quizzes, tests, and assignments.
  • describe the unique features of the African American literary voice in oral presentations and written assignments.
  • identify features of the oral tradition in a variety of texts on written quizzes and exams.
  • identify and evaluate key writers on written quizzes and exams.
  • learn various literary techniques and identify and evaluate the use of those techniques in oral presentations and written assignments.
  • analyze works by African American writers in terms of unifying themes in oral presentations and written assignments.
  • explain the effects of racisms, sexism, and economic exclusion—by focusing on particular historical events—on African American culture and literary tradition in oral presentations and written assignments.

TOPICAL OUTLINE:
  • The Beginnings: The Slave Trade, Middle Passage, and Early America
  • Abolitionist Movement: Writings About and By Slaves
  • Reconstruction
  • The Harlem Renaissance
  • Folk Traditions
  • Prominent Figures of the Mid 20th Century
  • The Civil Rights Movement and the Black Arts Movement
  • 21st Century Figures

TEXTBOOK / SPECIAL MATERIALS:
The Norton Anthology of African American Literature (Vol. 1 + 2, 3rd edition) or comparable materials.

See bookstore website for current book(s) at https://www.dacc.edu/bookstore

EVALUATION:
Quizzes
Midterm Exam
Final Exam
Presentations
Papers
Attendance & Participation
10%
15%
15%
20%
30%
10%

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE:
Membership in the DACC community brings both rights and responsibility. As a student at DACC, you are expected to exhibit conduct compatible with the educational mission of the College. Academic dishonesty, including but not limited to, cheating and plagiarism, is not tolerated. A DACC student is also required to abide by the acceptable use policies of copyright and peer-to-peer file sharing. It is the student’s responsibility to become familiar with and adhere to the Student Code of Conduct as contained in the DACC Student Handbook. The Student Handbook is available in the Information Office in Vermilion Hall and online at: https://www.dacc.edu/student-handbook

DISABILITY SERVICES:
Any student who feels s/he may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the Testing & Academic Services Center at 217-443-8708 (TTY 217-443-8701) or stop by Cannon Hall Room 103. Please speak with your instructor privately to discuss your specific accommodation needs in this course.

REVISION:
Fall 2018

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