Course Descriptions & Syllabi

Course Descriptions & Syllabi

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Note: some or all of the courses in the subjects marked as "Transfer" can be used towards a transfer degree: Associate of Science and Arts or Associate of Engineering Science at DACC. Transferability for specific institutions and majors varies. Consult a counselor for this information.

Areas of Study | | LITR101 syllabus




COURSE NUMBER: LITR101
COURSE TITLE:Introduction to Poetry
DIVISION:Liberal Arts
IAI CODE(S): H3 903
SEMESTER CREDIT HOURS:3
CONTACT HOURS:135
STUDENT ENGAGEMENT HOURS:
DELIVERY MODE:

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Reading and analysis of various types of poetry from different historical periods. Development of critical judgment and of analysis is expected as the student confronts literary meaning, form, value, terms, and characteristics.

PREREQUISITES:
Place into ENGL101.

NOTES:

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
It is expected that students will be able to use relevant critical terms in analyses of poems and to discuss in an informed way poetic forms, techniques, and genres.  Individual interpretation is required after instruction and practice in close reading of a wide range of poetic texts.  Essay examinations are required.  Formal, critical essays totaling fifteen pages outside of class are required and are evaluated for clarity, coherence, and mechanics. Substantial freedom from surface errors is required.  Students may be asked to read aloud and attend one or more readings.

TOPICAL OUTLINE:
Genres and forms (throughout the semester)
Techniques and aspects (throughout the semester)
Devices and effects (primarily in the first two weeks)
Critical contexts (beginning week two, then throughout the semester)

TEXTBOOK / SPECIAL MATERIALS:
DiYanni, Robert. Modern American Poets: Their Voices and Visions. 2nd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1994.

Hall, Donald. Literary and Cultural Theory. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2001.

Knorr, Jeff. An Introduction to Poetry: The River Sings. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2004.

Lichtenstein, Alice. Voices and Visions. Debuque: Kendall Hunt, 1987.

EVALUATION:
Essay exams are required.  Formal, critical essays totaling fifteen pages outside of class are required and are evaluated for clarity, coherence, and mechanics.  Substantial freedom for surface errors is required.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE:
Membership in the DACC community brings both rights and responsibility. As a student at DACC, you are expected to exhibit conduct compatible with the educational mission of the College. Academic dishonesty, including but not limited to, cheating and plagiarism, is not tolerated. A DACC student is also required to abide by the acceptable use policies of copyright and peer-to-peer file sharing. It is the student’s responsibility to become familiar with and adhere to the Student Code of Conduct as contained in the DACC Student Handbook. The Student Handbook is available in the Information Office in Vermilion Hall and online at: https://dacc.edu/student-handbook

DISABILITY SERVICES:
Any student who feels s/he may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the Testing & Academic Services Center at 217-443-8708 (TTY 217-443-8701) or stop by Cannon Hall Room 113. Please speak with your instructor privately to discuss your specific accommodation needs in this course.

REVISION:
Fall 2010

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