Course Descriptions & Syllabi

Course Descriptions & Syllabi

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Note: some or all of the courses in the subjects marked as "Transfer" can be used towards a transfer degree: Associate of Science and Arts or Associate of Engineering Science at DACC. Transferability for specific institutions and majors varies. Consult a counselor for this information.

Areas of Study | Mathematics - 16 courses
MATH107 Applied Mathematical Concepts (Fall, Spring and Summer) – 5.0 hours
Course Description: This course is intended for students who are pursuing applied science degrees (not requiring college algebra). The emphasis is on applications and problem solving. The following topics are introduced through solving practical problems which involve the modeling of natural phenomena. Topics of study include numerical analysis, variation, modeling with functions and equations, operations with polynomials, greatest common factor, introduction to functions, graphical analysis, and models of growth, linear equations and inequalities, and polynomials as related to applied sciences such as nursing, criminal justice, accounting, commercial floriculture, floral design, landscape design/construction, management, and marketing.
NotesThis course involves group-work. Students must have access to the internet, word processing, Microsoft Excel, and printing capabilities. A TI-83/83+ or TI-84/84+ graphing calculator is required for all sections. After successful completion of this course, students will be able to take MATH115 Survey of Statistics or MATH108 Intermediate Algebra.
[ C]

MATH108 Intermediate Algebra (Fall, Spring and Summer) – 4.0 hours
Course Description: A study of the properties of real numbers, the properties of exponents and radicals, the arithmetic of polynomial and rational expressions, linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, systems of linear equations, and an introduction to functions. Problem-solving skills and critical-thinking skills are emphasized. Face to face sections meet for 4 hours of combined lecture/lab.
Notes
  • The student should obtain a 60% competency as measured by examination to receive a passing grade
  • A student who is taking this course as a prerequisite for another math course should receive a 70% competency before taking the succeeding course


MATH110 Computer Science (Fall) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: This course is an introduction to the basic techniques of numerical analysis and programming using C++ on the microcomputers. It includes discussions of computer history, algorithms, flow charts, and the structure and design of software, including debugging. Students get actual experience operating a computer and peripheral equipment. The course is designed for business and engineering students. Class meets 4 hours per week. 2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours.
NotesThis course involves a great deal of work on the student's' part and would be nearly impossible for the student to master the content without persistently working the problems. Students are expected to spend an additional 4-5 hours per week outside of class to complete all assignments. Course activities include:
  1. lectures
  2. case studies
  3. videos or invited speakers
  4. assignment discussion
The class web page is updated every week, which provides supplemental information such as announcements, lecture notes, homework assignments, and students' grades. [ T] IAI: CS 911

MATH111 College Algebra (Fall, Spring and Summer) – 5.0 hours
Course Description: A review of the fundamental topics of algebra, including the complex number systems, simplification and manipulation of algebraic expressions involving polynomials, rational exponents, radicals, fractions, the solution of polynomial equations and inequalities. Emphasis is placed on the study of the following functions: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and their applications. These will be explored using traditional graphing techniques, graphing calculators and other online tools.
Notes [ T]

MATH114 Trigonometry (Fall and Summer) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: The study of the six trigonometric and circular functions, their inverses, the identities associated with these functions, the graphs associated with these functions, trigonometric equations and their applications. A graphing calculator is recommended.
Notes [ T]

MATH115 Survey of Statistics (Statistics for non-math majors) (Fall, Spring and Summer) – 3.0 hours
Course Description:

Focuses on statistical reasoning and the solving of problems using real-world data rather than on computational skills. Strong emphasis is on interpretation and evaluation of statistical results that arise from simulation and technology-based computations using technology such as the required TI83/84 Graphing Calculator with a built-in statistical package, and Microsoft Excel spreadsheets. Topics include data collection processes (observational studies, experimental design, sampling techniques, bias), descriptive methods using quantitative and qualitative data, bivariate data, correlation, and least­-squares regression, basic probability theory, probability distributions (normal distributions and normal curve, binomial distribution), confidence intervals and hypothesis tests using p-values.

This course is designed as a general survey of basic statistical methods. Emphasis is placed on methodology, and applications to biological, social, and management sciences are stressed to underscore the practicality of the material.

Notes [ T] IAI: M1 902

MATH118 Mathematics for Elementary Education I (Fall) – 4.0 hours
Course Description: The study of concepts taught in elementary school with a focus on problem solving and reasoning. Topics include whole numbers, rational numbers, irrational numbers, basic number theory, arithmetic, number patterns, and algebra. This is the first of a two-course sequence (followed with MATH 119).
Notes [ T] IAI: M1 903

MATH119 Mathematics for Elementary Education II (Spring) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: The second of a two-course sequence (along with MATH 118). Together, these two courses are designed to help you develop the mathematical content knowledge necessary to effectively teach math at the elementary level. Emphasis is placed on structure, meaning, relationships, and types of thinking in elementary mathematics. This course focuses on measurement, geometry, statistics, and probability.
Notes [ T] IAI: M1 903

MATH120 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I (Fall and Spring) – 5.0 hours
Course Description: The course is the first of a three semester sequence of integrated calculus and analytic geometry. Both understanding of theoretical concepts and the ability to use manipulative techniques are considered of prime importance. The approach is intuitive and after the student has attained a conceptual understanding, the theorems are advanced and proved. Time is spent in applications as they arise throughout the course. The course presumes algebraic and trigonometric competency at the 70% level or higher. Graphing calculator recommended.

The following description is for the full Calculus sequence (M1900-1, M1900-2, M1900-3): Topics include (but are not limited to) the following: limits and continuity; definition of derivative, rate of change, slope; derivatives of polynomial and rational functions; the chain rule; implicit differentiation; approximation by differentials; higher-order derivatives; Rolle's Theorem and mean value theorem; applications of the derivative; antiderivatives; the definite integral; the fundamental theorem of calculus; area, volume, other applications of the integral; the calculus of the trigonometric functions; logarithmic and exponential functions; techniques of integration, including numerical methods, substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric substitution, and partial fractions; indeterminate forms and L'Hôpital's rule; improper integrals; sequences and series, convergence tests, Taylor series; parametric equations; polar coordinates and equations; vectors in 2 and 3 dimensions, vector operations; lines and planes in space; surfaces, quadric surfaces; functions of more than one variable, partial derivatives; the differential, directional derivatives, gradients; double and triple integrals, evaluation and applications; cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Notes [ T] IAI: M1 900 MTH 901

MATH125 Introductory Analysis I (Calculus for Business & Sciences) (Fall and Spring) – 4.0 hours
Course Description: A freshman level calculus class intended for transfer students pursuing degrees in the fields of agricultural science, business/accounting, engineering/industrial technology and psychology. This course may also serve as a math elective for various other transfer programs, but will not count toward a major or minor in mathematics. Emphasis is on applications of the basic concepts of calculus rather than proofs and business and social science applications are stressed throughout the course. The course covers a broad range of topics that include limits and continuity, the definition of the derivative, techniques for differentiation applied to polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions, applications of the derivative, maxima and minima of functions, single and multivariable calculus, higher order derivatives, implicit differentiation, the antiderivative and indefinite integral, techniques of integration including substitution and integration by parts, numerical integration and the Riemann sum, the fundamental theorem of calculus, the definite integral and double integrals. Other topics covered may include but would not be restricted to differentials and approximation, improper integrals, functions of several variables, partial derivatives and multiple integrals. The class meets four hours per week.
Notes

Credit will not be given for both MATH125 and MATH120.
This course is not for Math and Science Majors.

[ T] IAI: M1 900B

MATH130 Calculus & Analytic Geometry II (Spring) – 5.0 hours
Course Description: The second course in calculus and analytic geometry. Topics include techniques of integration and differentiation of exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and hyperbolic functions; limit of indeterminate forms; polar coordinates; parametric equations; conic sections; infinite series. Both the understanding of theoretical concepts and the ability to use manipulative techniques are considered of prime importance. A TI-83 or better calculator is recommended.
Notes

This course involves a great deal of work on student's part and would be nearly impossible for the student to master the content without persistently working the problems. As a prerequisite, students are expected to possess the knowledge of calculus I. Students are expected to spend an additional 5-6 hours per week outside of class to complete all assignments. To achieve the general education goals and learning outcomes, students will communicate meaningfully in writing while presenting information. Students will translate quantifiable problems into mathematical terms and solve these problems using mathematical operations. Students will construct graphs and charts, interpret them, and draw appropriate conclusions.

Course activities include
  1. Speaking Assignments: students will present research individually or in groups using current technology to support the presentation; students will participate in discussions and debates related to the topics in the lessons.
  2. Case Studies: Complex situations and scenarios will be analyzed in cooperative group settings or as homework assignments.
  3. Lectures: This format will include question and answer sessions to provide interactivity between students and the instructor.
  4. Videos or Invited Speakers: Related topics will provide impetus for discussion. The class web page is updated every week, which provides supplemental information such as announcements, lecture notes, homework assignments, and students' grades.
[ T] IAI: M1 900 MTH 902

MATH135 Intro. Analysis II (Finite Math) (Fall and Spring) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: An introduction to finite mathematics for students in the social or life sciences, business and economics, with applications from these fields. Emphasis is on concepts and applications, rather than mathematical structures. Required topics must include systems of linear equations and matrices, linear programming, counting and probability theory. Additional topics include vectors, determinants, systems of inequalities, simplex method, set theory, logic and Boolean algebra, stochastic processes, game theory, Markov chain methods, mathematical modeling and the mathematics of finance. Instruction on computer programming techniques using calculators will be included. Not for Math or Science majors. May be taken before MATH 125.
Notes [ T] IAI: M1 906

MATH137 Introduction to Linear Algebra (Spring) – 4.0 hours
Course Description: This course is a study of introductory linear algebra. Basic techniques are introduced involving vectors and matrices; vector spaces and subspaces; linear dependence and independence, transformations and dimensionality; determinants; orthogonality; and inner product spaces. MATLAB and Mathematica are utilized as a tools for working with tedious problems.
NotesThis course is a basis for a first undergraduate course in linear algebra. Because linear algebra provides the tools to deal with many problems in fields ranging from forestry to nuclear physics, it is desirable to make the subject accessible to students from a variety of disciplines. There is a blend of intuition and rigor in the presentation. It is anticipated that the student will attain at least 70% accuracy in meeting these objectives. [ T]

MATH140 Calculus & Analytic Geometry III (Fall) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: The third course in calculus and analytic geometry. Topics include vectors in 2 and 3 dimensions, vector operations, lines and planes in space, quadric surfaces, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, gradients, double and triple integrals and their applications. Both the understanding of theoretical concepts and the ability to use manipulative techniques are considered of prime importance. A TI-83 or better calculator is recommended.
NotesThis course involves a great deal of work on the student's part and would be nearly impossible for the student to master the content without persistently working the problems. As a prerequisite, students are expected to possess the knowledge of calculus I and II. Students are expected to spend an additional 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete all assignments. To achieve the general education goals and learning outcomes, students will communicate meaningfully in writing while presenting information. Students will translate quantifiable problems into mathematical terms and solve these problems using mathematical operations. Students will construct graphs and charts, interpret them, and draw appropriate conclusions. Course activities include:
  1. Speaking Assignments: students will present research individually or in groups using current technology to support the presentation; students will participate in discussions and debates related to the topics in the lessons.
  2. Case Studies: Complex situations and scenarios will be analyzed in cooperative group settings or as homework assignments.
  3. Lectures: This format will include question and answer sessions to provide interactivity between students and the instructor.
  4. Videos or Invited Speakers: Related topics will provide impetus for discussion. The class web page is updated every week, which provides supplemental information such as announcements, lecture notes, homework assignments, and students' grades.
[ T] IAI: M1 900 MTH 903

MATH161 Statistics (Fall, Spring and Summer) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: Introductory statistics course at the non-calculus level. Focuses on statistical reasoning and the solving of problems using real-world data rather than on computational skills. Emphasis is on interpretation and evaluation of statistical results that arise from simulation and technology-based computations using technology more advanced than a basic scientific calculator, such as graphing calculators with a statistical package (TI83/84 recommended), spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel will be used), or statistical computing software. Topics include data collection processes (observational studies, experimental design, sampling techniques, bias), descriptive methods using quantitative and qualitative data, bivariate data, correlation, and least­-squares regression, basic probability theory, probability distributions (normal distributions and normal curve, binomial distribution), confidence intervals and hypothesis tests using p-values.
Notes [ T] IAI: M1 902 BUS 901

MATH211 Differential Equations (Spring) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: This is the first course regarding the theory and application of differential equations. Students will learn graph method, numerical method, and analytical method to solve differential equations with the emphasis in the analytical method. Topics include first-order, second-order and higher-order differential equations; linear systems of differential equations, Laplace transforms, series solutions, and numerical methods. Both the understanding of theoretical concepts and the ability to use manipulative techniques are considered of prime importance.
NotesThis course involves a great deal of work on the student's part and it would be nearly impossible for the student to master the content without persistently working the problems. As prerequisite, students are expected to possess the knowledge of calculus I, II, and III. Students are expected to spend an additional 3-4 hours per week outside of class to complete all assignments. To achieve the general education goals and learning outcomes, students will communicate meaningfully in writing while presenting information. Students will translate quantifiable problems into mathematical terms and solve these problems using mathematical operations. Students will construct graphs and charts, interpret them, and draw appropriate conclusions. Course activities include:
  1. Speaking assignments: students will present research individually or in groups using current technology to support the presentation; students will participate in discussions and debates related to the topics in the lessons.
  2. Case Studies: Complex situations and scenarios will be analyzed in cooperative group settings or as homework assignments.
  3. Lectures: This format will include question and answer sessions to provide interactivity between students and the instructor.
  4. Videos or Invited Speakers: Related topics will provide impetus for discussion. The class web page is updated every week, which provides supplemental information such as announcements, lecture notes, homework assignment, and students' grades.
[ T] IAI: EGR 904 MTH 912

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