Course Descriptions & Syllabi

Course Descriptions & Syllabi

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Note: some or all of the courses in the subjects marked as "Transfer" can be used towards a transfer degree: Associate of Science and Arts or Associate of Engineering Science at DACC. Transferability for specific institutions and majors varies. Consult a counselor for this information.

Areas of Study | Literature - 13 courses
LITR101 Introduction to Poetry (As Needed) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: Reading and analysis of various types of poetry from different historical periods. Development of critical judgment and of analysis is expected as the student confronts literary meaning, form, value, terms, and characteristics.
Notes [ T] IAI: H3 903

LITR102 Introduction to Drama (Fall, evvery other year) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: Understanding drama by reading, discussing, and writing about representative plays from Greek, Elizabethan and modern playwrights.
Notes [ T] IAI: H3 902

LITR103 Introduction to Fiction (Fall and Spring) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: Reading and analysis of short stories and novels from different historical periods and cultures. Development of critical judgment and of analysis is expected as the student confronts literary meaning, form, value, characteristics, and terms.
Notes [ T] IAI: H3 901 EGL 917

LITR104 Afro-American Literature (Spring) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: This course is a survey of texts by prominent African American writers and speakers from the 18th, 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries and includes an introduction to fiction, poetry, nonfiction and drama, along with examples of political and public discourse. Students will analyze how authors employ different techniques in a number of genres and will explore prominent themes within this particular literary tradition, including (but not limited to) identity, belonging, freedom, and security. Students will establish connections between historical events, such as reconstruction and the development of Jim Crow laws, and the development of the African American literary tradition. Interconnections between the African American literary tradition and African American folklore and music will also be established. Students will critically read in order to craft written arguments and informative presentations and to contribute to critical, academic in-class discussions.
Notes [ T] IAI: H3 910D

LITR105 Introduction to Film (Fall and Spring) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: Students will be required to demonstrate the ability to read, speak and write a cinematic vocabulary and demonstrate through these avenues a knowledge of genre styles and aspects of the production and direction of those genres. Students will comprehend, through class discussion, assignments and examinations, an understanding of motion picture delivery and production. Students will be required to compare films each to the other w/r/t concepts of how films are inspired artifacts of culture.
Notes [ T] IAI: F2 908

LITR106 Women in Literature (Spring, every other year) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: A survey of the literature by and about women from its beginnings to the present, with emphasis on the recent reawakening of women's consciousness, sex-role stereotyping, and similar literary and artistic issues.
Notes [ T] IAI: H3 911D

LITR109 The Bible as Literature (Spring) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: The Bible is often described as a single book, but, as many scholars and theologians recognize, this book is comprised of sections that were collected over time and were later anthologized. There are also many editions of this text that vary in terms of what is included and what is omitted. Over the course of the semester, students will study The Bible from a literary perspective, not as a religious text. The purpose of this course is to analyze the literary forms and genres within Judeo-Christian biblical canon. In this course, students will read, analyze, and discuss sections from both the Old and New Testaments and will examine literary forms, such as origin myths (Genesis) and lyrical poetry (the Psalms), for example.
Notes [ T] IAI: H5 901

LITR111 Non-Western Literature (Spring, every other year) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: An introduction to literature in English by writers from non-western cultures, including Asian, South Asian, African, Caribbean, and Middle Eastern, with an emphasis on the intellectual, social, and political contexts of their works.
Notes [ T] IAI: H3 908N EGL 919

LITR113 American Literature I (Fall) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: A study of classic American authors to the Civil War. An introduction to Colonial Literature: Alcott, Bradford, Bradstreet, Franklin, Hawthorne, Poe, Thoreau, Stowe, and others.
Notes [ T] IAI: H3 914

LITR114 American Literature II (Spring) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: A study of the classic American authors since the Civil War. An introduction to Dickinson, Hemingway, Cather, Faulkner, Frost, Walker, Morrison and others.
Notes [ T] IAI: H3 915

LITR121 Chief English Writers I (As Needed) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Swift, and other authors. Emphasis on the importance of such authors to the present day, both artistically and socially.
Notes [ T] IAI: H3 912

LITR122 Chief English Writers II (As Needed) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Browning, Tennyson, Arnold, Shaw, Yeats, Dickens, Eliot, and a selection of representative 19th and 20th century prose.
Notes [ T] IAI: H3 913

LITR131 Intro. to Shakespeare (Fall, every other year) – 3.0 hours
Course Description: The study of Shakespeare through eight of his dramas/tragedies, histories, and comedies. The Elizabethan period, Elizabethan drama, and the influence on Shakespeare on literature and culture are also discussed.
Notes [ T] IAI: H3 905

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